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Author Archives: Chris Prener

Rexnord, whose employees are the latest victims of shifting work to Mexico (Photo via New York Times)

 

Happy Friday! We’re excited to be back after our technical difficulties last week.

 

The Power Pose*

When the Revolution Came for Amy Cuddy (New York Times Magazine)

Beyond “power pose”: Using replication failures and a better understanding of data collection and analysis to do better science (Andrew Gelman)

 

When Work Disappears

Becoming a Steelworker Liberated Her. Then Her Job Moved to Mexico. (New York Times)

After the check is gone (The Washington Post)

The right way to help declining places (The Economist)

‘There’s no future for taxis’: New York yellow cab drivers are slowly drowning in debt (The Guardian)

 

Progress by the Dollar

How Money Became the Measure of Everything (The Atlantic)

 

On Campus

The Decline of the Midwest’s Public Universities Threatens to Wreck Its Most Vibrant Economies (The Atlantic)

Protesters heckle Richard Spencer at Univ. of Florida talk (CNN)

When Conservatives Suppress Campus Speech (New York Times)

College Advice I Wish I’d Taken (New York Times)

A better way to search through scientific papers (The Economist)

Oxford accused of ‘social apartheid’ as colleges admit no black students (The Guardian)

Fearless girl statute in New York City. An audit of the firm that designed it revealed they had been systematically underpaying women and minorities. (Photo via Boston Globe)

Here is our latest collection of the news and essays we’ve been reading. Happy Friday!

 

Equifax

Equifax makes money by knowing a lot about you (Seattle Times)

How the Equifax Hack Could Hurt Anyone Applying for a Job (The Atlantic)

 

At Work

It’s nine years since the recession. So why are employers still stingy with raises? (Washington Post)

The gender pay gap that still needs to be closed (The Economist)

The firm that brought us ‘Fearless Girl’ was underpaying women, U.S. government says (Washington Post)

 

Cuba

Clueless on Cuba’s economy (The Economist)

A ‘Sonic Attack’ on Diplomats in Cuba? These Scientists Doubt It (New York Times)

U.S. expulsion of Cuban diplomats includes all business officers (Reuters)

 

Gender

Super Awesome Sylvia was a role model to girls in science. Then he realized he is a boy. (Washington Post)

The Department of Justice Takes a Stand Against Transgender Rights in the Workplace (The Atlantic)

Should Universities Ban Single-Gender Discussion Panels? (The Chronicle)

 

Tensions on Campus

Confederate Flags With Cotton Found on American University Campus (New York Times)

After a Speaker Is Shouted Down, William & Mary Becomes New Flash Point in Free-Speech Fight (The Chronicle)

Racist Incidents Plague U. of Michigan, Angering Students and Testing Leaders (The Chronicle)

Death at a Penn State Fraternity (The Atlantic)

Then San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick after a game (via ESPN)

Here is a collection of what we’ve been reading this week. Happy Friday!

 

#TakeAKnee

After Anthem Protests, N.F.L. Plots a Careful Path Forward (New York Times)

Football has Always Been a Battleground in the Culture War (The Atlantic)

Football really is America’s religion. That’s what made the NFL protests so powerful. (Vox)

 

Puerto Rico

At the U. of Puerto Rico, Widespread Damage and Anxiety After Maria (The Chronicle)

The Jones Act, the obscure 1920 shipping regulation strangling Puerto Rico, explained (Vox)

 

LGBTQ

Trans Teen’s Murder Case Raises Question: Do LGBTQ Hate Crime Laws Work? (NBC)

Trump Administration Will Urge Court to Rule Against Gay Workers’ Rights (NBC)

U.S. No Longer Playing Leading Role in UN’s LGBTQ Human Rights Group (NBC)

 

On Campus

Amid Professors’ ‘Doom-and-Gloom Talk,’ Humanities Ph.D. Applications Drop (The Chronicle)

Racist Symbols Are Found at American U. After Launch of Anti-Racist Center (The Chronicle)

Virginia Tech professor accused of scamming National Science Foundation (Washington Post)

 

Spatial Inequality

America’s Most and Least Distressed Cities (CityLab)

Why Texas Is No Longer Feeling Miraculous (New York Times)

Protesters in St. Louis on Monday, September 18 via The Chicago Tribune

Here is a selection of the news articles and essays we’ve been reading this week.

 

Policing in America

Shooting of Georgia Tech student stirs old debate, with new questions (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

Audio released of 911 call by Georgia Tech student killed by police (Washington Post)

George Tech Cop Who Shot LGBT Student Scout Schultz Wasn’t Trained in Dealing with Mentally Ill (Newsweek)

White ex-St. Louis cop acquitted in black suspect’s killing (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

Department of Justice won’t prosecute Stockley for civil rights violation (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

St. Louis police have fatally shot 8 armed people this year – the highest number in a decade (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

As St. Louis simmers over Stockley verdict civil rights leaders say region must address inequality (St. Louis Public Radio)

Review Board Recommends Stiffest Punishment for Officer in Garner Case (New York Times)

 

On Campus

What Ole Miss Can Teach Universities About Grappling With Their Pasts (The Atlantic)

What DACA’s End Could Mean for Colleges (The Atlantic)

Dust-Up Involving Conservative Student Sparks Political Uproar in Nebraska (The Chronicle)

A Free-Speech Divide: Why students and professors may think differently about free expression (The Chronicle)

 

Labor and Work

Induction of union-busting Reagan into Labor’s Hall of Honor shocks union (Washington Post)

Uber Loses Its License to Operate in London (New York Times)

Irma is Most Recent Stop for ‘Adrenaline Junkies’ of Disaster Rescue Team (New York Times)

 

Immigration in the U.S.

What the Waiting List for Legal Residency Actually Looks Like (The Atlantic)

Labor Unions Are Stepping Up To Fight Deportations (Huffington Post)

 

In Uniform

Building Mentorship Out of Trauma (The Atlantic)

For the first time, the Marine Corps plans to have a female infantry officer among its ranks (Washington Post)

Black Detectives in New York Were Bypassed for Promotions, Panel Finds (New York Times)

Antifa activists in Oakland, CA before an action (via The Washington Post)

Here are some of the articles and essays we read this week. Happy Friday!

 

Gender and Work

Gender Bias Suit Could Boost Pay, Promotions for Women at Google (Wired)

Nikon Picked 32 Photographers to Promote a Camera. All 32 Were Men. (New York Times)

 

Contingent Labor

Meet the Camperforce, Amazon’s Nomadic Retiree Army (Wired)

 

Campus Life

Boston College Graduate Employees Union Wins Election, Gains Collective Bargaining Rights (The Heights)

From Prison to Ph.D.: The Redemption and Rejection of Michelle Jones (New York Times)

Is Free Speech Really Challenged on Campus? (The Atlantic)

 

Wealth

What the Rich Won’t Tell You (New York Times)

 

No Fascist USA!

‘No Fascist USA!’: how hardcore punk fuels the Antifa movement (The Guardian)

Antifa: Guardians against fascism or lawless thrill-seekers? (Washington Post)

The Rise of Antifa (The Atlantic)

 

The Cajun Navy: Volunteers and Disasters

I downloaded an app. And suddenly, was part of the Cajun Navy. (Houston Chronicle)

Mother Of 9 Goes Door-To-Door As Part Of Yemen’s Anti-Cholera Brigade (NPR)

Finally, I came across an organization called Global D.I.R.T, which is mentioned in articles from The Washington Post on Hurricane Irma and U.S.A. Today on Hurricane Harvey.

Golfers playing as the Eagle Creek wildfire rages behind them in Washington State and Oregon

This week we’re introducing our “Friday Roundup” – a weekly compilation of news articles and essays that we think might be of interest to our readers.

Race in America

DACA Dreams

Harvey, Irma, and the Burning West

Policing and Hospitals

Tech

Today we are posting three articles related to work hours. In May, the Washington Posts’s “Wonkblog” argued that the next frontier of workplace legislation was “over when you work, not how much you make.” Their post provides some excellent context for the articles included in our panel. Our articles cover a wide range of topics. Naomi Gerstel and Dan Clawson’s lead article details the ways scheduling can impact workers in a variety of ways. Kyla Walters and Joya Misra describe the constraints placed on workers in the retail industry, and Brian Halpin details the use of last minute scheduling in a restaurant kitchen. Enjoy!